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SETTING SUN”S CANDLE TO NATURE’S ONLY MORNING WINDOW

Jonathan recognizes the black-spot among dark ocean wave…. A fishing-boat form.. He sets sun’s candle to Nature’s only morning window; guiding Atlantic fisherman, as Scituate Light would, in dark, stormy morning rise… leading to comfort and calmness of Scituate anchor.

AS SHE MOVES FORWARD

AS SHE MOVES FORWARD

As She put shoulder to rising sun, she had remembered what her Father and Mother had said “Only those who attempt the absurd, achieve the impossible”

JUST FOR THE HECK OF IT

JUST FOR THE HECK OF IT

SO… why do they fly so low to ocean-wave and floor?

We were in Mancos, Colorado when I picked up his print; A Tim Cox creation called “Just for the Heck of it”. One of my favorite paintings.. It depicts a cowboy, in full rain gear, holding reins in one hand, steadying hat with other.. At a full run with his horse..I mean full-run.. Huge thunder clouds in the distance; sun setting on them.. Calm where he rides. There appears to be no reason for his action other than what the author (painter) has shown me “Just for the heck of it”…

SO… why do they fly so low to ocean-wave and floor?

PATTERNS OF THREE

PATTERNS OF THREE

I came across an interesting pattern and the words for it, but had to wait for the bird to cooperate, and just before it left my viewers frame… it pitched and rolled as if it new what I was up to.

Wind Mill
Marsh Mill
Bird Mill
Three

Onshore winds
Rushing
Brushing
Past me

Sea breeze turning
Lifting aviator
on rising tidal Moon

NOT TO BE MISTAKEN FOR MR. SULLIVAN’S “DRINKING BIRD”

What does this remind you of?

In 1946 Mr. Miles V. Sullivan patented the “Drinking Bird” whose origins are from a 1910s China toy called the “Insatiable Birdie” … A toy that appears to be of perpetual motion but in reality is an example of thermodynamics and a working theory of the heat engine.
This on the other hand is one of Nature’s fishermen.

“NO ONE HAD MORE FUN THAN I”

“No one had more fun than I”… Not sure how to take that one.. At first I wanted to do research on Mr. Jones, the inscription, and his memorial; find out what those words meant to him, but as quick as that thought rose, I dismissed it.. I don’t want to know what those words meant to him.. Anyways, it’s not the saying that lured me to this memorial. It was because it was a rock. A boulder. There are a few memorials along neighborhood street and Minot beach seawall… all benches except this one… A boulder and a clearing….. and for some reason, unknown to me, It’s footing stirred the feelings of why I started the Sunrise Project.. But why the stirring? … maybe it’s because I like sitting on rocks more than benches or that it’s more connected to the surrounding….I don’t know.. but I know its simple….Maybe that’s how his life was. It wasn’t about the toys but the experience, not about who he knew but how he spent time with family and friends. But then his saying throws me off..It can’t always be fun, I mean he was old enough to have served in WWII…we all have to have those moments; those minutes, days, months or maybe years of feelings that I would not categorize as fun.. maybe it’s better put “No one was more accepting than I”… That would make for a good life… Maybe that’s it..
What ever the reason….I brought my own to the rock and for that I thank you Mr. Jones.Image

MODERN-DAY HEROES OF MONTREAL

MODERN HEROES OF MONTREAL

Up very early morning…downtown Old Montreal heading towards the Notre Dame Basilica at Place d’Armes (seen in the background); listening to quiet city noise when thought was interrupted by old-fashoined school-bell sound. It was to alert the Montreal Fire Department of an emergency. I quickly set up: low ISO, f/11 aperture; pushing shutter speed into the seconds. In turn I caught the light-travel of the modern-day heroes of Montreal.

Gin Getz

Sharing an untamed view.

Okanagan Okanogan

Reclaiming the Art of Living on the Earth

Michael Lewis Glover | Fine Art Photography

Architectural, HDR, Nature, & Landscape Photography

Life in a Photograph

Photography by André Diogo Pereira